If a family member or loved one dies due to another person’s misconduct or because of negligence, wrongful death can be cited. The surviving members of the person’s family can claim wrongful death in order to gain compensation for lost wages from the victim, funeral and medical expenses. In short, those who suffered damage, financially or otherwise, from the death of an individual, can claim compensation for such a devastating turn of events.

Who Can File for Wrongful Death

While most people believe that only immediate family can file claims for wrongful death, the reality is that there are actually a few other entities who can claim losses due to such an occurrence.

These are called real parties in interest and can include the following, depending on which State you are in:

Putative spouses, dependents, and life partners – Some States consider domestic partners, or otherwise called life partners, as eligible to claim compensation. It is called the right of recovery and includes those who are financially dependent on the person and those who thought they were actually married to the victim (putative spouse).

People who suffered financially from the loss – A few States allow those who suffered financial losses from the death of an individual due to negligence to file a wrongful death claim. This means that anyone who was dependent on the individual who died for their support or care, even if they were not related by blood, had a right to make such a claim.

Other family members – Immediate family members, such as a spouse, parents, and children, are the primary claimants in filing for wrongful death in all States. In some States, other family members can also do the same, such as grandparents, siblings, and cousins, as long as they have proof that they suffered from the loss of the person.

Common Causes of Wrongful Death

What exactly can be considered a “wrongful death”? A wrongful death is when an intentional action (such as murder) or negligence is to be blamed for the person’s death. This can include a number of different occurrences, with each State having a particular list of rules that can be used when considering whether a death is considered wrongful or not.

There are many causes that can be included in what is generally seen as wrongful death. These include the following:

  • Medical Malpractice
  • Exposure to Occupational Hazards
  • Criminal Actions
  • Assisted Living Abuse and Negligence
  • Injuries at Birth
  • Commercial Vehicle Accidents
  • Vehicular Accidents
  • Location Accidents

Who Can Be Held Liable for Wrongful Death

When it comes to finding who is liable for these things, it depends on what happened and how the person died. For example, when a person dies due to a commercial vehicular accident, those who can be held liable for these include the operator of the vehicle, the driver, and the manufacturer of the vehicle. This is also dependent on the cause of the accident.

The ones who can be held liable for wrongful death claims are those who may have had a hand in the demise of the deceased. These can be anyone that is deemed responsible for an accident, for failing to provide safe working conditions, for failing to ensure the safety of passengers, and many more.

What to Do When a Loved One Dies a Wrongful Death

When you suspect that negligence or misconduct played a huge part in the death of a loved one, you might have a claim for compensation. While getting compensation for the loss of a person dear to you won’t ever bring them back or replace them, it can help you move on and live a life that is relatively normal despite the disappearance of the person you depended on.

When a person suddenly dies due to causes that could have been prevented with care or when someone purposely causes such an event to happen, you can be left not only with emotional and psychological scars but also with financial burdens. These can include medical bills, funeral bills, and the cost of living after the person is gone, particularly when you are dependent on them for your needs.

If you suspect that the death of a loved one can be considered a wrongful death, but are not sure, answer this questionnaire to find out. You don’t need to keep wondering if you are owed money for the disappearance of someone dear to you. Simply answer these questions and find out in a minute if your claim has merit.

As with most claims, wrongful death claims come with a statute of limitations (SOL). You may not be aware of it but your SOL may soon be over. Don’t delay in finding out and getting what you are owed by answering our questionnaire today.

If a family member or loved one dies due to another person’s misconduct or because of negligence, wrongful death can be cited. The surviving members of the person’s family can claim wrongful death in order to gain compensation for lost wages from the victim, funeral and medical expenses. In short, those who suffered damage, financially or otherwise, from the death of an individual, can claim compensation for such a devastating turn of events.

Who Can File for Wrongful Death

While most people believe that only immediate family can file claims for wrongful death, the reality is that there are actually a few other entities who can claim losses due to such an occurrence.

These are called real parties in interest and can include the following, depending on which State you are in:

Putative spouses, dependents, and life partners – Some States consider domestic partners, or otherwise called life partners, as eligible to claim compensation. It is called the right of recovery and includes those who are financially dependent on the person and those who thought they were actually married to the victim (putative spouse).

People who suffered financially from the loss – A few States allow those who suffered financial losses from the death of an individual due to negligence to file a wrongful death claim. This means that anyone who was dependent on the individual who died for their support or care, even if they were not related by blood, had a right to make such a claim.

Other family members – Immediate family members, such as a spouse, parents, and children, are the primary claimants in filing for wrongful death in all States. In some States, other family members can also do the same, such as grandparents, siblings, and cousins, as long as they have proof that they suffered from the loss of the person.

Common Causes of Wrongful Death

What exactly can be considered a “wrongful death”? A wrongful death is when an intentional action (such as murder) or negligence is to be blamed for the person’s death. This can include a number of different occurrences, with each State having a particular list of rules that can be used when considering whether a death is considered wrongful or not.

There are many causes that can be included in what is generally seen as wrongful death. These include the following:

  • Medical Malpractice
  • Exposure to Occupational Hazards
  • Criminal Actions
  • Assisted Living Abuse and Negligence
  • Injuries at Birth
  • Commercial Vehicle Accidents
  • Vehicular Accidents
  • Location Accidents

Who Can Be Held Liable for Wrongful Death

When it comes to finding who is liable for these things, it depends on what happened and how the person died. For example, when a person dies due to a commercial vehicular accident, those who can be held liable for these include the operator of the vehicle, the driver, and the manufacturer of the vehicle. This is also dependent on the cause of the accident.

The ones who can be held liable for wrongful death claims are those who may have had a hand in the demise of the deceased. These can be anyone that is deemed responsible for an accident, for failing to provide safe working conditions, for failing to ensure the safety of passengers, and many more.

What to Do When a Loved One Dies a Wrongful Death

When you suspect that negligence or misconduct played a huge part in the death of a loved one, you might have a claim for compensation. While getting compensation for the loss of a person dear to you won’t ever bring them back or replace them, it can help you move on and live a life that is relatively normal despite the disappearance of the person you depended on.

When a person suddenly dies due to causes that could have been prevented with care or when someone purposely causes such an event to happen, you can be left not only with emotional and psychological scars but also with financial burdens. These can include medical bills, funeral bills, and the cost of living after the person is gone, particularly when you are dependent on them for your needs.

If you suspect that the death of a loved one can be considered a wrongful death, but are not sure, answer this questionnaire to find out. You don’t need to keep wondering if you are owed money for the disappearance of someone dear to you. Simply answer these questions and find out in a minute if your claim has merit.

As with most claims, wrongful death claims come with a statute of limitations (SOL). You may not be aware of it but your SOL may soon be over. Don’t delay in finding out and getting what you are owed by answering our questionnaire today.

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