Offshore Employment
 
When you say that a person is working “offshore”, it generally means that a person is working a distance away from shore. Most offshore jobs require employees to stay on their post for weeks-on-end, with daily workhours ranging from 10 to 12 hours, and with supervisors and managers spending longer hours at work. People who work in this industry often live and work with 50 to 100 people just like them, all of whom are skilled at what they are hired to do.

Offshore employees can be found on drilling rigs, floating production storage and offloading vessels (FPSO), and on production platforms. Each type of installation comes with facilities that are made to help employees live a comfortable enough life while onboard. These include cabins and living quarters that are shared with others, a mess hall with lots of good food, and even a recreation area where they can unwind after a long day at work.

Offshore workers who are stationed on a production platform often have a two-weeks-on and two-weeks-off work schedule. Those who are assigned to work on an exploration and drilling rig often find themselves staying offshore longer. Most workers on these offshore jobs render approximately 168 working hours for each offshore tour and an equal amount of time on shore leave.
 
Different Injuries Offshore Workers are Prone To

The amount of time that a worker spends on these offshore work locations make them more susceptible to injuries. The extended hours that workers have to spend on their jobs usually result in fatigue and performance problems. These long hours also translate into increased risk of injuries and illnesses, sometimes because of the fatigue that comes with the long work hours.

People who work at these jobs find themselves susceptible to the following injuries and illnesses:

Slip, Trip, and Fall – As with most workplaces, the possibility of a slip, trip, and fall accident while working offshore is highly probable. This is because this kind of an accident is pretty common. Workers on rigs, ships, and platforms however stand a risk of more severe injuries due to the nature of their work. A fall from a platform can easily be fatal and slipping can result in serious injury due to the conditions that are present in this line of work.

Falling Objects – These types of accidents can also be more dangerous than in other work situations primarily because of the high heights that tools and other equipment may be dropped from. Lack of protective gear can aggravate such an accident and can even cause fatalities.

Getting Hit by Heavy Equipment – When you are on a rig, platform, or a ship, heavy equipment is always present. From cranes to forklifts to turbines, workers who are employed offshore are constantly exposed to the injuries that getting hit with such machinery can bring.

Falling Overboard – Since the job is located offshore and in the water, whether you are on a platform, a ship, or a drilling rig, you stand a chance of falling into the water. Slipping on an oil slick, tripping on a cable, or simply not watching where you are going can have you hurtling into the water below.

Toxic Material Exposure – Working in this industry can and will expose you to a lot of toxic substances, some of which are used to effectively operate the machinery being used, while others are a result of the work you are doing. Exposure to these toxic materials can open you up to the possibility of ailments that come with such an exposure. Sometimes these illnesses do not manifest themselves until later, after a few years of constant exposure.

Extreme Temperature Exposure – Offshore jobs can expose you to huge variances in temperature, and these include extreme hot and extreme cold situations. These can either come from the weather (winters and sudden cold snaps or heat waves) or from the equipment that you are using and what they produce.
 

What to Do When You Are Injured While Employed Offshore

When you work offshore, you should be aware of the risks involved with the job. You should also be aware of your rights when it comes to your ailments and injuries at these risky workplaces. Not only are you exposed to dangerous equipment and combustible materials on a regular basis. You are also exposed to the changeability of nature.

When you suffer an ailment or an injury while working offshore, you are entitled to worker’s compensation. As long as you are on the job and you find yourself in an accident or get sick from it, you are entitled to compensation. Unlike workers who work on land, those who work on offshore rigs, ships, and platforms are covered by a system of maritime laws. These include the Jones Act, LHWCA (Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act), and the OCSLA (Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act).

Much like Worker’s Compensation, the laws that govern offshore workers when it comes to their injury and accident claims cover everything from medical expenses, to lost wages, to temporary disability benefits. The difference between regular worker’s compensation and that filed by offshore workers is that the latter can actually sue for personal injury benefits due to negligence. This is due to the Jones Act.

If you think that your offshore accident is the result of negligence, you may be owed money. Act now before your statute of limitations runs out. To find out if you have a legitimate claim, answer this questionnaire. You can find in a minute whether or not you are entitled to compensation under the Jones Act.

 

Offshore Employment
 
When you say that a person is working “offshore”, it generally means that a person is working a distance away from shore. Most offshore jobs require employees to stay on their post for weeks-on-end, with daily workhours ranging from 10 to 12 hours, and with supervisors and managers spending longer hours at work. People who work in this industry often live and work with 50 to 100 people just like them, all of whom are skilled at what they are hired to do.

Offshore employees can be found on drilling rigs, floating production storage and offloading vessels (FPSO), and on production platforms. Each type of installation comes with facilities that are made to help employees live a comfortable enough life while onboard. These include cabins and living quarters that are shared with others, a mess hall with lots of good food, and even a recreation area where they can unwind after a long day at work.

Offshore workers who are stationed on a production platform often have a two-weeks-on and two-weeks-off work schedule. Those who are assigned to work on an exploration and drilling rig often find themselves staying offshore longer. Most workers on these offshore jobs render approximately 168 working hours for each offshore tour and an equal amount of time on shore leave.
 
Different Injuries Offshore Workers are Prone To

The amount of time that a worker spends on these offshore work locations make them more susceptible to injuries. The extended hours that workers have to spend on their jobs usually result in fatigue and performance problems. These long hours also translate into increased risk of injuries and illnesses, sometimes because of the fatigue that comes with the long work hours.

People who work at these jobs find themselves susceptible to the following injuries and illnesses:

Slip, Trip, and Fall – As with most workplaces, the possibility of a slip, trip, and fall accident while working offshore is highly probable. This is because this kind of an accident is pretty common. Workers on rigs, ships, and platforms however stand a risk of more severe injuries due to the nature of their work. A fall from a platform can easily be fatal and slipping can result in serious injury due to the conditions that are present in this line of work.

Falling Objects – These types of accidents can also be more dangerous than in other work situations primarily because of the high heights that tools and other equipment may be dropped from. Lack of protective gear can aggravate such an accident and can even cause fatalities.

Getting Hit by Heavy Equipment – When you are on a rig, platform, or a ship, heavy equipment is always present. From cranes to forklifts to turbines, workers who are employed offshore are constantly exposed to the injuries that getting hit with such machinery can bring.

Falling Overboard – Since the job is located offshore and in the water, whether you are on a platform, a ship, or a drilling rig, you stand a chance of falling into the water. Slipping on an oil slick, tripping on a cable, or simply not watching where you are going can have you hurtling into the water below.

Toxic Material Exposure – Working in this industry can and will expose you to a lot of toxic substances, some of which are used to effectively operate the machinery being used, while others are a result of the work you are doing. Exposure to these toxic materials can open you up to the possibility of ailments that come with such an exposure. Sometimes these illnesses do not manifest themselves until later, after a few years of constant exposure.

Extreme Temperature Exposure – Offshore jobs can expose you to huge variances in temperature, and these include extreme hot and extreme cold situations. These can either come from the weather (winters and sudden cold snaps or heat waves) or from the equipment that you are using and what they produce.
 

What to Do When You Are Injured While Employed Offshore

When you work offshore, you should be aware of the risks involved with the job. You should also be aware of your rights when it comes to your ailments and injuries at these risky workplaces. Not only are you exposed to dangerous equipment and combustible materials on a regular basis. You are also exposed to the changeability of nature.

When you suffer an ailment or an injury while working offshore, you are entitled to worker’s compensation. As long as you are on the job and you find yourself in an accident or get sick from it, you are entitled to compensation. Unlike workers who work on land, those who work on offshore rigs, ships, and platforms are covered by a system of maritime laws. These include the Jones Act, LHWCA (Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act), and the OCSLA (Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act).

Much like Worker’s Compensation, the laws that govern offshore workers when it comes to their injury and accident claims cover everything from medical expenses, to lost wages, to temporary disability benefits. The difference between regular worker’s compensation and that filed by offshore workers is that the latter can actually sue for personal injury benefits due to negligence. This is due to the Jones Act.

If you think that your offshore accident is the result of negligence, you may be owed money. Act now before your statute of limitations runs out. To find out if you have a legitimate claim, answer this questionnaire. You can find in a minute whether or not you are entitled to compensation under the Jones Act.

 

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