Worker’s Compensation

Work-related illnesses and injuries should be covered by your employer, as required by law. In short, any compensation that you should get when you are hurt while working is mandatory and should be afforded you by your employer. Before you run to your boss’ office asking compensation for that banged elbow or a migraine, you should first find out what worker’s compensation covers and what it actually is.
 
What is Worker’s Compensation?

Worker’s compensation is monetary or financial assistance extended to an employee by their employer when they get hurt while at work. This means that if you suffer an injury while you are working, your employer is bound by law to cover the expenses that come with such an injury. Worker’s compensation basically covers the following:

  • Reimbursement or payment of all medical bills associated with the injury or illness
  • Replacement of wages lost while the injured employee was off work recuperating from the injury or illness (this has a limit and is dependent on guidelines)
  • Compensation for income that is projected that a person may lose in the future due to the injury

Worker’s compensation also covers payments of benefits to the family of a worker who dies due to injuries sustained at work or who dies at work. A worker can claim worker’s compensation, regardless of who is at fault for the injury. Even if the worker is deemed at fault for what happened, they are still covered by worker’s compensation.
 
What Worker’s Compensation Does Not Cover

When an employee files worker’s compensation for their injuries, they cannot file a lawsuit against their employer for punitive damages, pain and suffering, and additional compensation due to negligence. If negligence is suspected as part of the reason for the person’s injury, the worker can choose to either file worker’s compensation or they can file a lawsuit against their employer for negligence. The latter can give the worker a chance at getting a bigger amount as compared with what he can get from his worker’s comp, but this is contingent on the lawsuit being successful.
 
Who Is Eligible for Worker’s Compensation?

In order to be eligible for worker’s compensation, you need to meet these three requirements:

Be an employee of the company you are filing worker’s comp with – To be considered an employee of the company, you should not be an independent contractor, volunteer, freelancer, or a consultant.

Your employer needs to have worker’s compensation insurance for his workers – While the law mandates businesses and employers to have worker’s compensation for their employees, in some States, this is dependent on the number of employees a business has. Sometimes, it will also depend on what the business is and what work the employees are engaged in.

The injury has to be work related or happened in the workplace – This is where some people make mistakes in filing worker’s compensation. They believe that anytime they are injured, just because they are employed, they can claim worker’s comp. In reality, for a person to be able to claim compensation for injuries, the injury or illness has to be work related or happened while at work.

If one of these requirements is not met, you might not be able successfully to file worker’s compensation claims.

What to Do When You Suffer an Injury at Work

In order to qualify for worker’s compensation, you first need to report the injury to your employer. You also need to file the necessary papers that will enable you to claim compensation. For injuries or illnesses that have been developing over time (like repetitive motion injuries or respiratory problems), inform your superiors about these as soon as you notice symptoms and suspect that it was caused by your work.

You need to report this within 30 days from the time of the injury or discovery of the illness in order for you to qualify for worker’s comp. You will need to get treatment for the illness or injury as soon as possible, and you will also need to tell your doctor or health professional that your injury is work-related so they can note this on their reports.

You will then need to file a claim form and give this to your employer who will submit your form to the claims administrator. This all needs to be accomplished a day after your injury report and has to be initiated by your employer. If your employer does not give you your worker’s compensation form a day after the incident, you can secure your own, fill it out, and give it to them for filing.

What to Do When Your Employer Does Not Have Worker’s Compensation?

If your employer or place of business does not have worker’s comp, they are still responsible for covering your medical bills and other bills related to your illness or injury. Since not having worker’s compensation is considered a criminal offense in some states, your employer may find themselves slapped with a fine as well as penalties of up to $100,000.

You can file for compensation with the UEBTF, or Uninsured Employees Benefit Trust Fund. You can also choose to file a lawsuit against your employer for not providing you with the coverage for your work-related injuries and illness. If your employer fails to file your claim within the specified time, robbing you of your compensation, this can also be grounds for a lawsuit.

If you have suffered a work injury and your employer does not have worker’s comp and refuses to help you with your medical bills, or if you suffered an injury due to your employer’s negligence, you may be owed compensation for this. Fill out this form and find out if you are eligible for compensation. You don’t have to suffer your injury and loss of income without any help. Find out in a minute whether you have a claim or not by filling out this questionnaire.

 

Worker’s Compensation

Work-related illnesses and injuries should be covered by your employer, as required by law. In short, any compensation that you should get when you are hurt while working is mandatory and should be afforded you by your employer. Before you run to your boss’ office asking compensation for that banged elbow or a migraine, you should first find out what worker’s compensation covers and what it actually is.
 
What is Worker’s Compensation?

Worker’s compensation is monetary or financial assistance extended to an employee by their employer when they get hurt while at work. This means that if you suffer an injury while you are working, your employer is bound by law to cover the expenses that come with such an injury. Worker’s compensation basically covers the following:

  • Reimbursement or payment of all medical bills associated with the injury or illness
  • Replacement of wages lost while the injured employee was off work recuperating from the injury or illness (this has a limit and is dependent on guidelines)
  • Compensation for income that is projected that a person may lose in the future due to the injury

Worker’s compensation also covers payments of benefits to the family of a worker who dies due to injuries sustained at work or who dies at work. A worker can claim worker’s compensation, regardless of who is at fault for the injury. Even if the worker is deemed at fault for what happened, they are still covered by worker’s compensation.
 
What Worker’s Compensation Does Not Cover

When an employee files worker’s compensation for their injuries, they cannot file a lawsuit against their employer for punitive damages, pain and suffering, and additional compensation due to negligence. If negligence is suspected as part of the reason for the person’s injury, the worker can choose to either file worker’s compensation or they can file a lawsuit against their employer for negligence. The latter can give the worker a chance at getting a bigger amount as compared with what he can get from his worker’s comp, but this is contingent on the lawsuit being successful.
 
Who Is Eligible for Worker’s Compensation?

In order to be eligible for worker’s compensation, you need to meet these three requirements:

Be an employee of the company you are filing worker’s comp with – To be considered an employee of the company, you should not be an independent contractor, volunteer, freelancer, or a consultant.

Your employer needs to have worker’s compensation insurance for his workers – While the law mandates businesses and employers to have worker’s compensation for their employees, in some States, this is dependent on the number of employees a business has. Sometimes, it will also depend on what the business is and what work the employees are engaged in.

The injury has to be work related or happened in the workplace – This is where some people make mistakes in filing worker’s compensation. They believe that anytime they are injured, just because they are employed, they can claim worker’s comp. In reality, for a person to be able to claim compensation for injuries, the injury or illness has to be work related or happened while at work.

If one of these requirements is not met, you might not be able successfully to file worker’s compensation claims.

What to Do When You Suffer an Injury at Work

In order to qualify for worker’s compensation, you first need to report the injury to your employer. You also need to file the necessary papers that will enable you to claim compensation. For injuries or illnesses that have been developing over time (like repetitive motion injuries or respiratory problems), inform your superiors about these as soon as you notice symptoms and suspect that it was caused by your work.

You need to report this within 30 days from the time of the injury or discovery of the illness in order for you to qualify for worker’s comp. You will need to get treatment for the illness or injury as soon as possible, and you will also need to tell your doctor or health professional that your injury is work-related so they can note this on their reports.

You will then need to file a claim form and give this to your employer who will submit your form to the claims administrator. This all needs to be accomplished a day after your injury report and has to be initiated by your employer. If your employer does not give you your worker’s compensation form a day after the incident, you can secure your own, fill it out, and give it to them for filing.

What to Do When Your Employer Does Not Have Worker’s Compensation?

If your employer or place of business does not have worker’s comp, they are still responsible for covering your medical bills and other bills related to your illness or injury. Since not having worker’s compensation is considered a criminal offense in some states, your employer may find themselves slapped with a fine as well as penalties of up to $100,000.

You can file for compensation with the UEBTF, or Uninsured Employees Benefit Trust Fund. You can also choose to file a lawsuit against your employer for not providing you with the coverage for your work-related injuries and illness. If your employer fails to file your claim within the specified time, robbing you of your compensation, this can also be grounds for a lawsuit.

If you have suffered a work injury and your employer does not have worker’s comp and refuses to help you with your medical bills, or if you suffered an injury due to your employer’s negligence, you may be owed compensation for this. Fill out this form and find out if you are eligible for compensation. You don’t have to suffer your injury and loss of income without any help. Find out in a minute whether you have a claim or not by filling out this questionnaire.

 

Answer a 60-second quiz to qualify for injury compensation. Get Started Now