Stroke

A stroke occurs when blood clots clog an artery, which is called a Transient Ischemic Attack, or when a blood vessel ruptures and bleeds in the brain, called a hemorrhagic stroke. The best way to determine whether a loved one has suffered a stroke is to conduct a simple test. Ask your loved one to:

  1. “Smile.” Look for drooping or sagging facial features.
  2. “Raise both arms.” Can they hold both arms evenly, or is one arm harder to lift than the other?
  3. “Repeat this sentence: ______________.” Ask them to repeat something like “The sun is shining.” Can they repeat it without problems?
  4. If you notice one side of the face sagging or drooping, one arm that doesn’t lift as well, and if the person can’t repeat a simple sentence, call 911 or take the person to the emergency room immediately. The faster the person receives help, the less they risk serious brain injury.

Other signs of stroke include weak feelings in hands, arms or legs; blindness or loss of vision in one or both eyes; inability to walk; feeling dizzy; incapable of understanding what other people are saying; an extreme headache.

To help prevent strokes, eat healthy foods, avoid smoking, check your blood pressure and cholesterol regularly, get annual physicals, manage your blood sugar if you are diabetic, and exercise often. People who are most likely to suffer strokes are those who are an advanced age, males, people who have a family history of strokes, and African-Americans.

Strokes cause physical, mental and emotional injuries, including impaired movement and speaking ability, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, vision loss, and development of seizures. Contact a personal injury attorney immediately to understand your rights involving strokes.

Answer this short questionnaire and immediately learn if you might get paid for your medical bills, loss of income and other monetary damages.

Stroke

A stroke occurs when blood clots clog an artery, which is called a Transient Ischemic Attack, or when a blood vessel ruptures and bleeds in the brain, called a hemorrhagic stroke. The best way to determine whether a loved one has suffered a stroke is to conduct a simple test. Ask your loved one to:

  1. “Smile.” Look for drooping or sagging facial features.
  2. “Raise both arms.” Can they hold both arms evenly, or is one arm harder to lift than the other?
  3. “Repeat this sentence: ______________.” Ask them to repeat something like “The sun is shining.” Can they repeat it without problems?
  4. If you notice one side of the face sagging or drooping, one arm that doesn’t lift as well, and if the person can’t repeat a simple sentence, call 911 or take the person to the emergency room immediately. The faster the person receives help, the less they risk serious brain injury.

Other signs of stroke include weak feelings in hands, arms or legs; blindness or loss of vision in one or both eyes; inability to walk; feeling dizzy; incapable of understanding what other people are saying; an extreme headache.

To help prevent strokes, eat healthy foods, avoid smoking, check your blood pressure and cholesterol regularly, get annual physicals, manage your blood sugar if you are diabetic, and exercise often. People who are most likely to suffer strokes are those who are an advanced age, males, people who have a family history of strokes, and African-Americans.

Strokes cause physical, mental and emotional injuries, including impaired movement and speaking ability, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, vision loss, and development of seizures. Contact a personal injury attorney immediately to understand your rights involving strokes.

Answer this short questionnaire and immediately learn if you might get paid for your medical bills, loss of income and other monetary damages.

Answer a 60-second quiz to qualify for injury compensation. Get Started Now