Tobacco

People who smoke or chew tobacco are at a very high risk of developing cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and heart disease. More than 45 million people smoke cigarettes in the U.S., and there are more than 440,000 deaths every year. What is even more unfortunate is that people who don’t smoke can die as well—from secondhand smoke. More than 3,400 nonsmokers die from lung cancer and 46,000 dies from heart disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Do you know what is in a typical cigarette? There are more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarettes, 200 or them that are poisonous. These include ammonia, arsenic, polonium 210, carbon monoxide and acetone. People who smoke or chew tobacco are at a very high risk of developing cancer, emphysema and heart disease. Cigarettes contain many different types of poisons. These poisons help make the cigarette addictive and help preserve the tobacco. However, the injuries the poisons do to the human body are almost too numerous to count. Cigarettes contain:

  • cyanide
  • benzene
  • formaldehyde
  • methanol
  • acetylene
  • ammonia
  • arsenic
  • carbon monoxide
  • acetone

For women, smoking is detrimental to the health of babies. Smoking has been linked to cervical cancer, although researchers don’t understand why. Cervical cancer attacks the woman’s reproductive organs. Some women who have cervical cancer must undergo complete hysterectomies, while others can be treated with surgery that leaves their reproductive organs in place. When a pregnant mother smokes, her baby has a high chance of developing birth defects or dying.

Chewing tobacco is just as dangerous. Almost ¾ of daily users have pre-cancerous or non-cancerous lesions in their mouths where they hold the chew. Smokeless tobacco products cause mouth, throat and pancreatic cancer, leukoplakia (the lesions, or sores, in the mouth), bone loss around teeth, bad breath and more.

To quit, visit www.cancer.orgwww.smokefree.govwww.cdc.gov, or call a quit smoking helpline in your area.

Some people are able to quit smoking on their own. However, quitting is very difficult because of the addictive chemicals in tobacco. There are a number of helpful sources, including nicotine patches, talk therapy, herbal remedies, hypnosis, and group support programs. People who are trying to quit often experience symptoms like headaches, anxiety, an increase in appetite, and dizziness. Sometimes it takes several attempts before a person can quit.

 

Tobacco

People who smoke or chew tobacco are at a very high risk of developing cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and heart disease. More than 45 million people smoke cigarettes in the U.S., and there are more than 440,000 deaths every year. What is even more unfortunate is that people who don’t smoke can die as well—from secondhand smoke. More than 3,400 nonsmokers die from lung cancer and 46,000 dies from heart disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Do you know what is in a typical cigarette? There are more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarettes, 200 or them that are poisonous. These include ammonia, arsenic, polonium 210, carbon monoxide and acetone. People who smoke or chew tobacco are at a very high risk of developing cancer, emphysema and heart disease. Cigarettes contain many different types of poisons. These poisons help make the cigarette addictive and help preserve the tobacco. However, the injuries the poisons do to the human body are almost too numerous to count. Cigarettes contain:

  • cyanide
  • benzene
  • formaldehyde
  • methanol
  • acetylene
  • ammonia
  • arsenic
  • carbon monoxide
  • acetone

For women, smoking is detrimental to the health of babies. Smoking has been linked to cervical cancer, although researchers don’t understand why. Cervical cancer attacks the woman’s reproductive organs. Some women who have cervical cancer must undergo complete hysterectomies, while others can be treated with surgery that leaves their reproductive organs in place. When a pregnant mother smokes, her baby has a high chance of developing birth defects or dying.

Chewing tobacco is just as dangerous. Almost ¾ of daily users have pre-cancerous or non-cancerous lesions in their mouths where they hold the chew. Smokeless tobacco products cause mouth, throat and pancreatic cancer, leukoplakia (the lesions, or sores, in the mouth), bone loss around teeth, bad breath and more.

To quit, visit www.cancer.orgwww.smokefree.govwww.cdc.gov, or call a quit smoking helpline in your area.

Some people are able to quit smoking on their own. However, quitting is very difficult because of the addictive chemicals in tobacco. There are a number of helpful sources, including nicotine patches, talk therapy, herbal remedies, hypnosis, and group support programs. People who are trying to quit often experience symptoms like headaches, anxiety, an increase in appetite, and dizziness. Sometimes it takes several attempts before a person can quit.

 

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